OSCON: ex-NASA cloud lead on his OpenStack startup, Piston

July 31, 2011

Last week  at OSCON in Portland, I dragged Josh McKenty away from the OpenStack one-year anniversary (that’s what Josh is referring to at the very end of the interview) to do a quick video.  Josh, who headed up NASA’s Nebula tech team and has been very involved with OpenStack from the very beginning has recently announced Piston, a startup that will productize OpenStack for enterprises.

Here is what the always entertaining Josh had to say:

Some of the ground Josh covers:

  • What, in a nutshell, will Piston be offering?
  • Josh’s work at NASA and how got involved in OpenStack
  • Timing around Piston’s general release and GA
  • The roles he plays on the OpenStack boards
  • What their offering will have right out of the shoot and their focus on big data going forward

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Dell announces availability of OpenStack solution; Open sources “Crowbar” software framework

July 26, 2011

Today at OSCON we are announcing the availability of the Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution along with the open sourcing of the code behind our Crowbar software framework.

The Solution

Dell has been a part of the OpenStack community since day one a little over a year ago and today’s news represents the first available cloud solution based on the OpenStack platform.  This Infrastructure-as-a-service solution includes a reference architecture based on Dell PowerEdge C servers, OpenStack open source software, the Dell-developed Crowbar software and services from Dell and Rackspace Cloud Builders.

Crowbar, keeping things short and sweet

Bringing up a cloud can be no mean feat, as a result a couple of our guys began working on a software framework that could be used to quickly (typically before coffee break!) bring up a multi-node OpenStack cloud on bare metal.   That framework became Crowbar.  What Crowbar does is manage the OpenStack deployment from the initial server boot to the configuration of the primary OpenStack components, allowing users to complete bare metal deployment of multi-node OpenStack clouds in a matter of hours (or even minutes) instead of days.

Once the initial deployment is complete, Crowbar can be used to maintain, expand, and architect the complete solution, including BIOS configuration, network discovery, status monitoring, performance data gathering, and alerting.

Code to the Community

As mentioned above, today Dell has released Crowbar to the community as open source code (you can get access to it the project’s GitHub site).  The idea is allow  users to build functionality to address their specific system needs.  Additionally we are working with the community to submit Crowbar as a core project in the OpenStack initiative.

Included in the Crowbar code contribution is the barclamp list, UI and remote API’s, automated testing scripts, build scripts, switch discovery, open source Chef server.  We are currently working with our legal team to determine how to release the BIOS and RAID which leverage third party components.  In the meantime since it is free (as in beer) software, although Dell cannot distribute it, users can directly go the vendors and download the components for free to get that functionality.

More Crowbar detail

For those who want some more detail, here are some bullets I’ve grabbed from Rob “Mr. Crowbar” Hirschfeld’s blog:

Important notes:

  • Crowbar uses Chef as it’s database and relies on cookbooks for node deployments
  • Crowbar has a modular architecture so individual components can be removed, extended, and added. These components are known individually as “barclamps.”
  • Each barclamp has it’s own Chef configuration, UI subcomponent, deployment configuration, and documentation.

On the roadmap:

  • Hadoop support
  • Additional operating system support
  • Barclamp version repository
  • Network configuration
  • We’d like suggestions!  Please comment on Rob’s blog!

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Structure: Learning about DevOps & Crowbar from Jesse Robbins

June 27, 2011

Last week on Day two of Structure the morning sessions ended with an  interesting discussion moderated by James Urquhart.  The session was entitled “DevOps – Reinventing the Developers Role in the Cloud Age” and featured Luke Kanies – CEO, Puppet Labs and Jesse Robbins – Co-Founder and CEO, Opscode.

After lunch I ran into Jesse and got him to sit down with me and provide some more insight into DevOps as well as explain what Opscode was doing with project Crowbar.

Some of the ground Jesse covers

  • (0:21) What is DevOps
  • (1:00) The shift that happens between developers and operations.  Writing code and getting it into production faster and how it shifts responsibilities between the two groups.
  • (2:52) Who are the prime targets for DevOps and how has this changed over time.
  • How DevOps began in web shops who needed to do things differently than legacy-bound enterprises.
  • How enterprises faced with greenfield opportunities are now embracing devops
  • (5:36) The crowbar installer which employs Opscode’s Chef and allows the rapid provisioning of an OpenStack cloud.

Extra-credit reading:


Structure: OpenStack launches Incubation program

June 24, 2011

Today was second day of the two-day Structure conference here in San Francisco.  Cloud was the topic du jours with heavy referencing of big data and concepts and projects such as OpenFlow, Open Compute and OpenStack.  The format consisted mainly of moderated panels seated in comfy chairs with break out sessions scheduled a couple of times during the day.

While some of the panels and speakers were quite enlightening, I find the true benefit of a show like Structure comes from the networking and hallway conversations that occur.  One such conversation was one I had with Jonathan Bryce of Rackspace about the incubation program they have just launched for OpenStack.

Some of the ground Jonathan covers:

  • Dealing with the question of how to expand OpenStack and include new projects
  • The initial three core projects: Compute, Object Storage and Image Service
  • The first two projects that have been approved for incubation: a dashboard and “keystone”

Stay tuned for more interviews from Structure 11.

Pau for now…


Cyber Infrastructure org goes with OpenStack and Dell

June 20, 2011

Cybera, a Canadian not-for-profit recently selected OpenStack along with Dell systems to build out their Infrastructure as a Service cloud.  The organization, which is based in Alberta, “collaborates with public and private sector partners to accelerate research and product development that meets the needs of today’s society.”

Most recently Cybera used OpenStack to build out a cloud for CANARIE’s (Canada’s Advanced Research and Innovation Network) DAIR project.

Here’s what Cybera had to say in their blog:

To start with, you’ll need hardware. If you have the time and inclination, the best thing to do might be to ask Rackspace Cloud Builders for some help spec’ing out the hardware for OpenStack. This is the route that Cybera went and we got some badly needed advice. Since you might not be able to go that route, I’ll tell you what we know.

At the end of the day we went with Dell, based on the Cloud Builders’ advice and our own due diligence. If you aren’t aware of it yet, Dell is supporting OpenStack in a big way. They have a number of pages dedicated to it here. There’s also a whitepaper that discusses hardware and network for OpenStack, if you feel like filling out the form.

We ordered four different types of servers (aka nodes). A management node (nova-api, nova-network, nova-scheduler, nova-objectstore), compute nodes (nova-compute, nova-volume), a proxy node (swift-proxy-server) and storage nodes (swift-object-*, swift-container-*, swift-account-*). All nodes were contained in the Dell C6100 chassis. Here are the specs:

Processor Sockets Cores Threads RAM Disk
Management E5620 2 8 16 24 8 x 300 GB
Compute X5650 2 12 24 96 6 x 500 GB
Proxy E5620 2 8 16 24 4 x 300 GB
Storage E5620 2 8 16 24 6 x 2 TB

Great to see people picking up OpenStack and running with it!

Read more about Cybera’s experience at Running OpenStack in Production: Part 1: Hardware

Pau for now…


Ubuntu cloud update — OpenStack, Eucalyptus, Ensemble & Orchestra

June 7, 2011

Today when I was walking the floor at the Cloud Expo here in New York, I ran into fellow Austinite Dustin Kirkland.  Dustin is the manager for systems integration team for Ubuntu.  I got Dustin to give me the low down on the most recent UDS (Ubuntu Developer Summit) that concluded a few weeks ago in Budapest:

Some of the ground that Dustin covers

  • The big areas of focus on the server side coming out of Budapest
  • Getting behind OpenStack as the Ubuntu IaaS platform
  • [1:09] The pioneering work they’ve done with Eucalyptus and how its use case differs from that of OpenStack
  • [2:05] The Ensemble project, a service orchestration framework for the cloud which is the brainchild of Mark Shuttleworth.
  • [3:59] Ubuntu Orchestra for cloud installation, provisioning and configuration management (using Puppet)

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Cloud.com on OpenStack and powering RightScale’s myCloud

June 7, 2011

Last night at Cloud Expo, I got some time with Cloud.com‘s CMO Peder Ulander to learn how they are working with two key partners, OpenStack and RightScale.  Peder told me how OpenStack is a key relationship for Cloud.com and gave me a quick overview of today’s announcement that Cloud.com is powering RightScale’s myCloud Private Cloud offering:


Some of the ground Peder covers:

  • Open Stack:  The development work Cloud.com is doing on OpenStack; their work on a Swift implementation; and how Cloud.com and OpenStack might play together going foward
  • [1:25] RightScale:  The myCloud announcement and the advantages it brings to enterprises.  How the two companies are doing joint development and joint marketing.

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


Citrix to launch OpenStack Distro (with a little help from Rackspace and Dell)

May 25, 2011

Today at Citrix Synergy, Citrix announced “Project Olympus,” their up coming OpenStack distribution.  In case you’re not familiar with it, OpenStack is an open source cloud platform based on the code from NASA’s Nebula cloud as well as Rackspace’s storage code.  The OpenStack project kicked of last summer and already has gathered support from over 60 commercial hardware and software vendors.

Mt. Olympus and the Cloud

Citrix’s OpenStack Distro

Citrix’s Project Olympus will produce a commercial distribution of the OpenStack infrastructure-as-a-service platform.  This “Olympian” distribution will be made up of two main components: a Citrix-certified version of OpenStack and a cloud-optimized version of XenServer.  While Citrix will lead with their Xen technology, thanks to OpenStack the distro will support all leading hypervisors.

Project Olympus is targeted at both public cloud providers as well as enterprise customers looking to build out private clouds.  The distribution will be available later this year.

But I want it now — The Citrix/Rackspace/Dell Early Access Program

For those who don’t want to wait until the official distribution is ready, don’t fret you can get started today through the Early Access Program (EAP).  The EAP is designed to help customers kick-off pilots and proof-of-concept deployments.  The program provides access to a beta version of the Citrix distro plus Dell hardware and deployment software as well as deployment services, training and on going customer support for customer clouds via Rackspace’s Cloud Builders program.

To get going with Citrix’s Project Olympus Early Access Program, please visit  http://www.citrix.com/olympus

Dell, Crowbar and Reference Architectures

Dell’s above-mentioned deployment software, aka “crowbar,” was a big hit at the last OpenStack Design summit.  The software which leverages Opscode’s Chef, allows folks to get an Openstack cloud up in running in less than four hours (instead of  days).  In addition to the deployment software and systems, to support the project Olympus EAP, Dell will also be providing reference architectures so keep your eyes peeled for those.

If you have any questions about what Dell is doing with OpenStack or want to get started, email us at OpenStack@Dell.com.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Gettin’ the scoop on the OpenStack Design Summit

April 28, 2011

Earlier this week, I attended the first two days of the OpenStack Design Summit out in Santa Clara, CA.  Before I took off I grabbed sometime with Jim  Curry, GM of Rackspace Cloud Builders and the leader of Rackpace’s OpenStack efforts.

I got Jim’s thoughts on how the summit was going, how the project was going as well as some breaking news.

Some of the ground Jim covers:

  • Jim’s areas of responsibility
  • How this week’s Design summit is different from the first two?  (how its grown and changed)
  • Some of the hot topics at this summit
  • Breaking news re. the next release, Diablo, milestones and a regular cadence
  • Note: I had a brain cramp and said Ubuntu follows the Mozilla schedule, I meant GNOME (go figure)

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


Eucalyptus back at OpenStack Design Summit

April 26, 2011

At the last OpenStack design summit, I sat down with Eucalyptus co-founder Graziano Obertelli and got his thoughts on the effort.  This morning I bumped into a now clean-shaven Graziano and thought Id get his input on this week’s summit.

Some of the ground Graziano covers:

  • What Graziano’s goals are for this weeks OpenStack summit
  • What sessions he plans to attend
  • Eucalyptus’s big upcoming 3.0 release
  • Looking forward to really engaging with the Eucalyptus community

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


Forrester’s James Staten on OpenStack

April 26, 2011

Earlier today the OpenStack Design Summit kicked off here at the Hyatt in Santa Clara.  This four day event is bringing together developers, users and business people to discuss OpenStack and design its future.

Among this morning’s attendees was James Staten Forrester Research’s cloud guru.  I grabbed James at the first break and got his thoughts on the event’s kick-off and OpenStack in general.

Some of the ground James covers:

  • Why he chose to attend and what he’s looking for
  • What he thought of the opening presentations and how something like an OpenStack could alleviate some of the pain of outages like Amazon had last week.
  • What type of outcomes he would like to see from this weeks summit.
  • How important are programs like Rackspace’s cloud builder effort.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Rackspace’s head of OpenStack talks about Facebook’s Open Compute

April 7, 2011

This morning at Facebook’s headquarters in Palo Alto the company announced their Open Compute project  Partners and kindred spirits were there to tell the story behind Open Compute and explain what they think it means to the industry.  One group of kindred spirits were the individuals from Rackspace.  I got some time with Jim Curry who heads up OpenStack at Rackspace after the event officially ended.

Here is what Jim had to say:

Some of the topics Jim covers:

  • Driving efficiencies in data center design requires looking at the issue holistically.
  • Learning from Facebook’s successes and failures.
  • Looking forward to collaboration in an area that hasn’t historically had a lot of collaboration.
  • Engagement with Facebook engineers on how to run OpenStack on their hardware.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Dell, Equinix and Rackspace launch Free OpenStack Demo environment

March 30, 2011

OpenStack, the open source cloud platform based on code donated by NASA and Rackspace, has gained considerable traction since it was launched eight months ago.  The community has rapidly grown and there have been several releases.  Now its time to get potential customers trying it out and kicking the tires.

With the idea of removing friction to adoption and make the testing out of the platform as easy as possible, Dell, Equinix and Rackspace are announcing today the availability of a free OpenStack cloud demonstration and test environment.

The idea of the demo environment is to allow organizations to easily evaluate OpenStack and assess application performance on the platform in a low risk environment for free.  The next step after a successful demo would be a proof of concept.

Movin workloads around the country

This demo environment is initially available in three U.S. data centers and in Q2 of this year this offering will also be available in Equinix data centers in Europe and Asia.  The initial data centers are:

  • Equinix Silicon Valley
  • Equinix Asburn, VA
  • Rackspace Chicago

By having geographically dispersed facilities customers are able to test out the moving of applications and workloads between them.

The various parts

The OpenStack demo environment is made up of the following components

Widening the circle

The name of the game here is making the trying out of OpenStack as easy as possible.  There are a lot of community members and open source aficionados who are already testing out OpenStack.  The idea with OpenStack cloud demonstration environment is to provide a set up where a greater number of organizations feel comfortable evaluating the platform for themselves.

Try it, you just might like it 🙂

Extra-credit reading

Updated reading

Pau for now…


Dells Data Center Solutions group turns Four!

March 28, 2011

Dell’s Data Center Solutions group (DCS) is no longer a toddler.  Over the weekend we turned four!

Four years ago on March 27, 2007 Dell announced the formation of the Data Center Solutions group, a special crack team designed to service the needs of hyperscale customers.  On that day eWeek announced the event in their article Dell Takes On Data Centers with New Services Unit and within the first week Forrest Norrod, founding DCS GM and currently the GM of Dell’s server platform division, spelled out to the world our goals and mission (in re-watching the video its amazing to see how true to that mission we have been):

The DCS Story

If you’re not familiar with the DCS story, here is how it all began.  Four years ago Dell’s Data Center Solutions team was formed to directly address a new segment that begin developing in the marketplace, the “hyperscale” segment.  This segment was characterized by customers who were deploying 1,000s if not 10,000s of servers at a time.

These customers saw their data center as their factory and technology as a competitive weapon.  Along with the huge scale they were deploying at, they had a unique architecture and approach specifically, resiliency and availability were built into the software rather than the hardware.  As a result they were looking for system designs that focused less on redundancy and availability and more on TCO, density and energy efficiency.  DCS was formed to address these needs.

Working directly with a small group of customers

From the very beginning DCS took the Dell direct customer model and drove it even closer to the customer.  DCS architects and engineers sit down with the customer and before talking about system specs they learn about the customer’s environment, what problem they are looking to solve and what type of application(s) they will be running.  From there the DCS team designs and creates a system to match the customer’s needs.

In addition to major internet players, DCS’s customers include financial services organizations, national government agencies, institutional universities, laboratory environments and energy producers.  Given the extreme high-touch nature of this segment, the DCS group handles only 20-30 customers worldwide but these customers such as Facebook, Lawrence Livermore National Labs and Microsoft Azure are buying at such volumes that the system numbers are ginormous.

Expanding to the “next 1000”

Ironically because it was so high-touch, Dell’s scale out business didn’t scale beyond our group of 20-30 custom customers.   This meant considerable pent up demand from organizations one tier below.   After thinking about it for a while we came up with a different model to address their needs.  Leveraging the knowledge and experience we had gained working with the largest hyperscale players, a year ago we launched a portfolio of specialized products and solutions to address “the next 1000.”

The foundation for this portfolio is a line of specialized PowerEdge C systems derived from the custom systems we have been designing for the “biggest of the big.”  Along with these systems we have launched a set of complete solutions that we have put together with the help of a set of key partners:

  • Dell Cloud Solution for Web Applications: A turnkey platform-as-a-service offering targeted at IT service providers, hosting companies and telcos.  This private cloud offering combines Dell’s specialized cloud servers with fully integrated software from Joyent.
  • Dell Cloud Solution for Data Analytics: A combination of Dell’s PowerEdge C servers with Aster Data’s nCluster, a massively parallel processing database with an integrated analytics engine.
  • Dell | Canonical Enterprise Cloud, Standard Edition: A “cloud-in-a-box” that allows the setting up of an affordable Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas)-style private clouds in computer labs or data centers.
  • OpenStack: We are working with Rackspace to deliver an OpenStack solution later this year.  OpenStack is the open source cloud platform built on top of code donated by Rackspace and NASA and is now being further developed by the community.

These first four years have been a wild ride.  Here’s hoping the next four will be just as crazy!

Extra-credit reading

Articles

DCS Whitepapers

Case studies


Rackspace evolves OpenStack Governance

March 16, 2011

One of the trickiest things to get right in an open source project is the governance model.  Who makes up the various boards and gets what authority is something struggled over and something that virtually no one gets right straight out of the gate.  Its particularly interesting if you are a commercial entity sponsoring a project and want to maintain a certain amount of influence over the endeavor but also want it to grow and flourish.

Two weeks ago Jonathan Bryce, Rackspace cloud co-founder and one of the leads of the OpenStack project policy board, announced the changes that were being made to OpenStack’s governance.

I ran into Jonathan on Monday during South by Southwest and sat down with him to get some more insight into what the changes were and why they were being made.

Some of the ground Jonathan covers:

  • From Mosso to Rackspace cloud to OpenStack
  • How they’ve been surprised by the great uptake by the community and how this has led them to evolve the governance structure.
  • What the various boards are and what their make up will be
  • Which roles will be 6-month stints.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now..


OpenStack Installer Demo at SXSW

March 15, 2011

Last week and this, Austin’s downtown has been taken over by the South by Southwest festival (SXSW).  What started out nearly 25 years ago as a music festival/conference has grown to include parallel film and interactive events as well.  During the event every bar and venue downtown is occupied with bands, films or tech companies showing their stuff.

Yesterday Rackspace commandeered the Kung Fu Saloon in the name of the OpenStack project.  As part of this event, and before the drinking began, Dell did a demo of “Crowbar,” our OpenStack installer that we recently announced.

Check out the mini montage below that includes a quick interview I did with Dell solutions engineer Greg Althaus right after he finished the demo.

Don’t take our word for it

Dell is currently field testing crowbar and plans to donate the code to the OpenStack community after testing.  If you are interested in testing crowbar yourself, email us at OpenStack@Dell.com.

Some of the ground the video covers

  • Intro montage: Welcome to the Kung Fu Saloon, setting up and a snippet of the demo
  • [0:40] Talking to Greg
    • What actually is crowbar and how does it work with OpenStack compute and storage?
    • How fast can you spin up a cloud using it?
    • Where does OpsCode’s Chef fit in?
    • Our plan to donate this code to the community after field testing.  

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


OpenStack heads into Interstellar Overdrive

March 8, 2011

One small step for OpenStack, one giant step for mankind!  Ok, that may be taking it a bit far but today there is some exciting news that Dell and Rackspace have announced.

(I grabbed this image from a blog by varundev kashimath)If OpenStack is new to you it’s the open source cloud platform based off of the Nebula cloud code base donated by NASA (hence all the rocket allusions) and the storage code base from Rackspace.  The project is now about eight months old and its community is over 50 organizations strong including NASA, Citrix, AMD, Intel, NTT, cloud.com, RightScale, Dell, Opscode and Puppet labs.

(Graphic source: varundev kashimath’s blog)

The News

To help the community and organizations get up and going building out their own OpenStack based clouds we are announcing the following:

  1. Proof of Concepts: Rackspace and Dell are working together to deliver an OpenStack solution to market later this year.  As the first step along the way we are currently seeking customers for OpenStack proofs of concept (POC).  If you are interested in learning more about the POCs and possibly participating or getting engaged, email: OpenStack@Dell.com.
  1. Code: Dell has developed an OpenStack installer that can be used to quickly install OpenStack on bare metal Dell PowerEdge C servers.  This tool is being field tested, and Dell will contribute the code to the OpenStack community once testing is complete.  To help users out further, once the OS is installed, the servers can be updated with all the latest packages and be automatically configured by Opscode’s Chef to provide their services in the OpenStack infrastructure.
  2. Technical whitepaper: A technical whitepaper, “Bootstrapping OpenSource Clouds” which lays out the design of a hyperscale OpenStack cloud on Dell PowerEdge C servers.

But wait, there’s more, “Cloud Builders”…


To help support OpenStack deployments, Rackspace announced today that its launching  a new division, “Cloud Builders.”  Cloud Builders “will provide training, certification, deployment services and ongoing support and management to enterprises and service providers via the team of OpenStack experts and its partner network.”

Specifically the offerings will include (taken from the Rackspace blog):

  • Training & Certification – Rackspace Cloud Builders will provide training classes and certification testing for designing, developing and administering OpenStack Clouds. Rackspace also plans to empower a network of training and certification experts.
  • Deployment Services – Rackspace Cloud Builders, in conjunction with other experts from the OpenStack community, will help customers design and deploy OpenStack Clouds.
  • Support & Management – Customers will have ongoing access to remote support and escalation assistance from the OpenStack specialists, including proactive monitoring and fixes.

OpenStack is picking up momentum, stay tuned for more and in the meantime, set the controls for the heart of the sun! 🙂

Extra-credit reading and resources:

Pau for now…


DCS systems, solutions and MDC steal show at Dell sales kick-off

February 1, 2011

Every year at the end of January Dell holds a giant kick-off meeting for our enterprise and public sales forces.  The event, which has been held in Las Vegas the last two years, is a four-day happening consisting of keynotes, sessions and a full-scale expo where the sales team can touch and learn first-hand about the latest and greatest in Dell solutions and offerings.

Setting up the DCS Modular Data Center on the expo floor

At last year’s sales kick-off, the Data Center Solutions (DCS) group had our big coming out party, letting the sales force know that we would be expanding beyond our elite custom system business, with a specialized PowerEdge C line and a set of cloud solutions.

This year the systems and solutions have been out in the market for a little while and we were able to share actual case studies with the attendees showing how our systems and solutions have been able to solve real customer problems.  The big new addition to the DCS line up was our Modular Data Center (MDC) which, until just a few months ago, was reserved only for a very small group of select customers.

Gearing up for day two of both duty at the DCS booth.

As you can tell from the picture above, the MDC took up a big part of our booth.  It served to house our PowerEdgeC servers and host a selection of our cloud solutions:

Additionally, to provide a peak at what PowerEdge C systems we have up our sleeve, we had several units in an uber secret whisper suite.

Our overall message at the booth was that although these components can be used individually, if you want to run “the world’s most efficient hyperscale data center” you’ll want to combine these optimized solutions and systems with the MDC into one hyper-efficient, integrated system.

Well received

Now as a member of the DCS team I may be a little biased but I really think we had the coolest booth there 🙂  It was great to hear comments from the sales force such as “this is awesome!” and “why didn’t I know about this?!”

We’ll have to start now to figure how we will top this next year.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Mark Shuttleworth on UEC and OpenStack

January 11, 2011

Mark Shuttleworth, the ever gracious founder of Ubuntu, stopped by Dell this morning to talk to various folks about various subjects.   I was able to grab some time with him between meetings and get his thoughts on a few topics.

I was particularly interested in getting his thoughts on Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) which will be available this week from Dell as the Dell | Canonical UEC Solution (along with the UEC software, the solution is based on our PowerEdge C2100 and C6100 and comes with a reference architecture and deployment guide).   The other topic I wanted to get his insight into was OpenStack.

Here’s what Mark had to say:

What Mark talked about

  • How Mark has settled into his role as non-CEO (he is still chairman).
  • What he is focusing on these days: the cloud and product design e.g. Unity.
  • [1:45] The thinking behind UEC and the combined Dell Canonical offering.
  • [3:45] OpenStack and Canonical’s participation
  • Working with both OpenStack and Eucalyptus and how both of these are central to the process of standardization that we are starting to see at the infrastructure layer of cloud computing.

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


Rackspace’s CTO on the promise of OpenStack

November 18, 2010

Yesterday morning at the Web 2.0 summit out in San Francisco I sat in a session led by RackSpace‘s CTO John Engates.  After the session finished I grabbed some time with John to learn more about his thoughts on OpenStack, the open source cloud platform that Rackspace, along with NASA helped  kick off.

Some of the ground John covers:

  • How OpenStack directly addresses some of the most common reservations people have about the cloud.
  • How OpenStack is like Android.
  • (1:50) NTT’s interest in, and commitment to, OpenStack for the Japanese market.

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now..


%d bloggers like this: