The Spring Platform, Where its Been and Where its Going

August 22, 2016

Early this month, armed with my trusty Flipcam (and oldie but a goody), I attended SpringOne Platform hosted by by Pivotal.io.  While there I was able to grab a few interviews with some of the movers and shakers.  Given that the title of the event was “SpringOne,” I would have been remiss had I not grabbed one of the Spring community leaders.  I was able to convince Spring Framework developer, Rossen Stoyanchev of Pivotal to chat with me.

Take a listen as Rossen talks about the history and evolution of the Spring Framework.

Some of the ground Rossen covers

  • Spring Framework’s birth 12 years ago and the role of Rod Johnson’s book
  • Providing tools that simplify and symbiotically work with Java Enterprise
  • Additional Spring Projects e.g. Web Frameworks, Spring Integration, Spring Batch
  • The debut of Spring Boot in 2012 and the quick follow up by Spring Cloud which extended programming to new models
  • Where Spring is headed: reactive programming and much more

Extra-credit reading

  • Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development – Rod Johnson
  • Spring Boot, a quick overview — Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: Native Hybrid Cloud — The Pivotal Cloud Foundry Developer Platform in a Box – Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: When Web Companies grow up they turn into Java Shops – Barton’s Blog

Pau for now…


When Web Companies grow up they turn into Java Shops

August 17, 2016

Earlier this month I attended Pivotal’s SpringOne platform conference in Las Vegas.  In case you’re not familiar with it, Spring is a Java Framework “that helps development teams everywhere build simple, portable, fast and flexible JVM-based systems and applications.”

For some of you out there you may be thinking Java is old school and not relevant in in today’s modern world of digital business.  Au contraire mon frere.  James Governor, the D’artagnan of the analyst world,  countered this belief of irrelevance in his SpringOne talk entitled, “When Web Companies grow up, the become Java Shops.”

Take a listen as James backs up his claim.  (For extra credit see the Redmonk Programming Language Rankings below that places Java in the top right corner second only to JavaScript.  Click on the chart to enlarge the rankings).

Some of the ground James covers

  • Facebook as a big Java shop.  Twitter as a member of the JCP (Java Community Process)
  • Seeing a lot of Java innovation even outside of Android
  • Big Data e.g. Hadoop written in Java/JVM
  • We will see cloud native Java in the next 3-5 years

 

Redmonk Q3-16 language rankings

Redmonk Q3-16 language rankings

 

Pau for now…

 

 

 

 


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