Open Source Summit videos – Sputnik, Bitnami, ARM and OpenShift

October 24, 2017

Last month I attend Open Source Summit (OSS) North America which was held in Los Angeles from September 11- 14.

This year the Linux Foundation brought four conferences under the umbrella name,  “The Open Source Summit” (OSS).  The four conferences were LinuxCon, ContainerCon, CloudOpen plus the new “Open Community Conference.”

Interviewing and being Interviewed

While at the conference, besides giving away an Ubuntu-based XPS 13 developer edition aka “project Sputnik,” I found myself on both sides of the camera.  I was interviewed by Swapnil Bhartiya around the history of Project Sputnik and I in turn interviewed representatives of ARM, Red Hat’s OpenShift, and Bitnami’s Kubernetes effort.

Enjoy!

Project Sputnik

Here I am holding forth with regards to the origins and ideas behind Project Sputnik, our line of Linux-based developer systems.

 

Bitnami and Kubeless

  • Sebastian Goasguen’s Kubernetes-focused company SkipBox was recently acquired by Bitnami – the name comes from “(Skip)per” like Kubernetes and Tool(box) — which helps onboard people to Kubernetes.
  • Bitnami acquired SkipBox as a way to get into the Kubernetes space.  SkipBox’s key offering was “Kubeless,” a Kubernetes-native serverless framework which helps people move from Physical machines/VMs/cloud to containers and then to Kubernetes.

 

ARM’s development platform

  • Julio Suarez of ARM walks us through their demo at the Open Source summit.  The team was demoing their server enterprise development platform “Mali.”  Unlike Raspberry Pi, Mali is pretty beefy with 10GB Ethernet ports, SATA, PCI etc.
  • The platforms are clustered into a group of three using Docker Swarm (could also use Kubernetes, Marathon Mesos).  The swarm is running an ecommerce website, ported to ARM from x86.  The website is composed of 14 microservices.

 

Red Hat’s OpenShift

  • Harish Pillay talks about Red Hat’s Container as a Service offering, OpenShift.  While OpenShift began life with its own version of containers, they have pivoted to employ industry standard containers and Kubernetes.
  • Different pieces and technology can be swapped in and out as long as they are written to standards.

Conference reflections

Given the continued growth in the number of Linux Foundation projects and the number of sub events, the attendance of little over 1,900, albeit from 37 different countries, seemed a bit light.  Additionally the show floor seemed sparse compared to past.

I’m guessing that high level Open Source events don’t have the allure they once did, particularly since open source is a given in most environments today.  In turn, people are seeking out more targeted events around specific technologies eg DockerCon, KubeCon.  All that said it was a valuable conference thanks to the always interesting hallway track.

Dell EMC’s presence

I would be remiss if I didn’t at least mention my employer’s presence at the summit.

Dell EMC was represented by the rebranded “{code}” team who now represents the open source efforts across Dell Technologies.  While {code}’s press release introduced their new name and remit, the news they led with concerned REX-Ray:

REX-Ray, an established open source container orchestration engine that enables persistence for cloud-native workloads, now includes plugins for 15 storage integrations, with the addition of NFS, local block services and VFS, immediately making those storage platforms CSI-compatible.

Extra-credit reading

  • Open Source guides:  At the event the Linux foundation introduced a set of succinct Open Source guides targeted at enterprises to help
    • guide their use of and contribution to open source software and communities
    • explain the value of open source to management
    • formalize and organize their existing open source efforts
  • Videos: The keynote sessions were recorded and are available to watch.
  • Event Photos: To view a selection of photos from the events visit the Linux Foundation’s website.

Pau for now…

 

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Red Hat launches OpenShift v3.1, full of Docker/Kubernetes goodness

January 4, 2016

Im just getting around to publishing my interviews from KubeCon back in November

Today’s interview features Red Hat’s Grant Shipley, director of developer advocacy for “container application platform” OpenShift.  Grant talks about the launching of OpenShift v3.1 and what’s ahead.

Some of the ground Grant covers:

  • Announcing 3.1, the latest upstream version of Red Hat’s open source project OpenShift Origin
  • Enterprise comes with support for docker/kubernetes in production
  • Moving away from “PaaS” to “container application platform”
  • All functionality exposed via apis; cli and web console tools for ops; ops has full control but devs can self service
  • How it works with Ansible (or Puppet and Chef)
  • Whats next going forward: continuing to focus on dev experience whether they’re using node.js or Java

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now


Learning about Dell’s OpenStack private cloud offering

November 21, 2014

The week before last I was roaming the expo floor at Dell World and I bumped into Steve Croce.  Steve is at Dell and is the product manager and strategist for our OpenStack private cloud offering.

I got Steve to spend a few minutes with me and give me the lowdown on what we are offering and where Red Hat plays in.  Take a listen.

Some of the ground Steve covers

  • Who’s Dell targeting with our offering and how has that expanded
  • What is the stack comprised of: Hardware, Software and Services
  • Dell IT’s internal innovation lab running Red Hat’s OpenStack distro
  • What can we expect to see in the upcoming year

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now..


Talking to Red Hat about how they are working with Dell on OpenStack

November 12, 2014

Last week I participated in Dell World with my trusty Flipcam (yes, I still have one, if it ain’t broke…) and caught a bunch of interviews.  Several, not surprisingly, dealt with the cloud space.

The first  of these is with Red Hat Sr. Solution Architect, Ian Pilcher who was on the expo floor.  Ian was talking to attendees about how Red Hat and Dell are working together in the cloud space.  I got him to give a short overview.

Some of the ground Ian covers

  • How the two companies are working together around OpenStack
  • What are the use cases he’s seeing for the OpenStack solution
  • What is Red Hat doing with Docker (Hint: see Atomic Host)
  • What to expect from Red Hat and Dell vis-a-vis their OpenStack solution

Extra-credit reading

  • Red Hat goes nuclear in Linux container wars with Atomic Host beta – The Register

Pau for now…


The Future of PaaS, its “value proposition” and Docker

September 22, 2014

At last week’s Cloud Standards Customer Council held in Austin Texas, the first panel of the day dealt with “Current and Future PaaS Trends.”   The panel debated whether there should or could be a PaaS standard as well as what its future might look like.

One of the panelists was Diane Mueller, community manager of OpenShift Origin.  I grabbed some time with Diane after the panel and got her to share her thoughts on the viability of a PaaS standard and how she saw the technology evolving.

Stay tuned for two more posts from last week’s Cloud Standards Customer Council meeting and more PaaS prognostication.

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


OSCON: Talking OpenShift, RedHat’s Platform as a Service

August 22, 2013

Last but not least in my series of video from last month’s OSCON is an interview I did with Steve Citron-Pousty, Developer Evangelist for Red Hat’s OpenShift PaaS.

Take a listen to what the ever-entertaining Steve CP has to say:

Note: As with my interview with Neil of Inktank, I used Youtube’s feature that is supposed to fix an unsteady camera and the result gives the video a hallucinogenic feel (witness the slightly undulating stairs).

Some of the ground Steve covers:

  • What is OpenShift and Platform as a Service?  How is OpenShift different from other PaaSs?
  • OpenShift is “polyglottal:” it supports PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby, Node js and Java (with Java you get JBoss and Tomcat).  It also supports MySQL, Postgres and MongoDB right out of the box.
  • How they work with APIs and how APIs allow devs to create “situational apps.”
  • Steve’s Crystal Ball time:  in 3-5 years all developers will be using a PaaS (witness their wins with Ebay/PayPal, Accenture and DoD) + Git + a NoSQL data store.

Reference —  The rest of my OSCON interviews:

 Extra-credit reading

  • Blog:  Krishnan Subramanian: Making the Move to OpenShift
  • ZDnet: Red Hat opens OpenShift PaaS cloud for business

Pau for now…


Who’s Using GWT? Red Hat Joins the Fray

December 11, 2008

This morning on Twitter, Rich Sharples, Director of Product Management for the JBoss EAP (Enterprise Application Platform) and former Sun compadre, sent out the news that JBoss was adopting the Google Web Toolkit.

Here is what Rich had to say in his blog a few hours later:

Today Red Hat announced a couple of things :

1. that we’ve signed Google’s corporate contributor agreement

2. that we’re adopting GWT (Google Web Toolkit) as a core part of JBoss Middleware

The world doesn’t need another Java framework for developing rich AJAX apps. so we’ve decided to go with what we think is a real leader – Google Web Toolkit. (Read more)

(I hope this doesn’t mean that JBoss will be replacing us as the self-proclaimed GWT poster child 😉 )

gwt-videos

GWT draws inspiration from the Brady Bunch (does that make Alex, Cindy?)

And in other News

In other GWT related news today, Google posted a timeframe and details for their next release, 1.6.  And as if that wasn’t enough, Google also posted four sets of developer videos where each of the four gentlemen (including Lombardi Blueprint‘s very own Alex Moffat) discuss how GWT has helped them and why they chose it as their weapon of choice.

Update:  This just in… (non-geeks need not read on)

A  few hours after I originally posted this entry, the Register posted their summary of today’s events and quoted our Mr. Moffat

Alex Moffat, chief engineer at the business process management firm – and GWT user – Lombardi Software told El Reg he’s mostly interested in GWT 1.6’s string performance and compiler improvements.

However, Moffat said he’s disappointed to see GWT’s in-browser hosted mode has been moved to a “post 1.6” feature on Google’s roadmap. The feature, which lets developers debug their apps within a web browser rather than GWT, was originally slated for version 1.5 and then 1.6 until Google’s latest development update.

Pau for now…


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