Sun’s Champagne Super Nova

January 31, 2010

Coincidentally, the acquisitions of the last two companies I worked at both closed this week.  The first is Sun Microsystems where I worked from 1995 to 2008 and which was purchased by Oracle.  The second is Lombardi which I left at the end of last summer and which was acquired by IBM.

Two very different acquisitions.  One a Silicon Valley trailblazer whose acquisition took 9 torturous months to close, the other a star in the focused field of business process management which closed in less than six weeks.  One company on the way up, one an icon on the way down.

Farewell Sun

While I wish the employees of both the best of luck, I particularly mourn the loss of Sun.  It was an amazing company to have worked at.  I joined the month that Java was introduced and rode it through its dot.com dominance and then down the other side.  Even when its economic dominance waned, its willingness to take risk such as its refocusing on open source made it a fascinating place to be.  The tech industry will be a less interesting place now that it is gone.

I take heart in the fact that the Sun diaspora now outweighs those still employed there.  Sun alums can be found across the industry at companies big and small around the world (in fact there is a hearty band of us here at Dell).  While there is no more Sun “the company” there are thousands of bits of it scattered throughout the high-tech landscape.

Aloha Stanford University Network, 1982-2010

Pau for now…


Adam of Oracle talks about Oracle VM and the Cloud

November 16, 2009

A couple of weeks ago on the show floor of Cloud Computing Expo in Santa Clara I ran into Adam Hawley, Director of product management for Oracle VM.  When Adam finished his stint in the Oracle booth he sat down with me to talk about what was going on at Oracle in the world of virtualization and the cloud.

Some of the topics Adam tackles:

  • Oracle VM, Oracle’s sever virtualization and management platform, while based on Xen is all Oracle on top of it.
  • The Virtual Iron acquisition which is in the process of being incorporated within the Oracle portfolio and is slated for release in 2010.
  • The Cloud as a higher level of automation on top of virtualization, compared to what traditional virtualization has provided.
  • Where Oracle will play in the cloud space (hint: think private).
  • The Oracle assembly builder that Adam was showing off at the show.
  • Given Larry’s views on cloud computing, is “cloud” a dirty word at Oracle?

Pau for now…


Kibitzing about the Cloud: Ellison goes off

September 28, 2009

At last year’s Oracle financial meeting, Larry Ellison went on rant on the over-hyping of the term “cloud computing:”

I can’t think of anything that isn’t cloud computing with all of these announcements.  The computer industry is the only industry that is more fashion-driven than women’s fashion. Maybe I’m an idiot, but I have no idea what anyone is talking about. What is it? It’s complete gibberish. It’s insane. When is this idiocy going to stop?

Well its been a year later and the abuse of the term cloud has gone from bad to worse.  As a result, when Mr. Ellison appeared at the  Churchill Club last week and the question of Oracle’s possible demise at the hand of the cloud came up, he became a bit animated.  Enjoy!

(I love Ed Zander’s bemusement and reactions)

A man of few words

Of note is Larry’s succinct definition of cloud computing:  “A computer attached to a network.”  And its business model? “Rental.”

Pau for now…


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