Looking back at the original OpenStack design summit in 2010

April 26, 2016

Yesterday the OpenStack summit kicked off here in Austin, TX.   This week’s event is being attended by 7,500 individuals.

To give some perspective on the project’s growth, at the inaugural design summit back in 2010 there were 75 people in attendance.  The purpose of this initial invite-only event was to “develop a roadmap for the first release, spec out the software and spend the last two days prototyping and hacking.”

Since that time the project has been spun out of Rackspace and has become an independent foundation and today “Hundreds of the world’s largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day.”

Thoughts from day zero

To give you a feel for the project’s origins and what it’s aspirations were at that time, below is a set of interviews conducted at the event with some of the key players.

This first one, which does a good job of setting the stage, is an interview with the initial architect/project lead for OpenStack compute, Rick Clark.

The project has come quite a way since the initial meeting back in 2010 at the Omni hotel here in Austin.  It will be interesting to see where it is six years from now.

Pau for now…


Talking to OpenStack Chief Architect – Rick Clark

November 11, 2010

Yesterday, near the end of day two of the OpenStack design summit, I caught up with Rick Clark, chief architect of the OpenStack platform.  I wanted to get Rick’s thought’s on how the four-month old open source cloud computing project and the summit were going.

Here’s what he had to say:

Some of the ground Rick covers:

  • The goal of the summit as well as the goal of the next two releases.
  • How ready the various code bases are e.g. object storage and compute
  • The diversity of the attendees
  • How many of the attendees are open source vets vs newbies
  • Where the next summit will be

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


The OpenStack design summit in review

July 22, 2010

Tuesday after the OSCON cloud summit I sat down with Rick Clark over a well deserved beer.  Rick is the chief architect and project lead for the OpenStack compute project that was announced on Monday.

Last week I interviewed Rick on the first day of the inaugural OpenStack design summit and I wanted to catch up with him and get his thoughts on how it had gone.  This is what he had to say:

Some of the topics Rick tackles:

  • How it went engaging a very large technical group (100+) in an open design discussion patterned after an Ubuntu Developer Summit.
  • Some of the decisions he thought would be no brainers, turned out differently e.g. OVF (open virtualization format) and keeping the storage and compute groups separated.
  • Since the summit involved representatives from over 20 companies, some of them competitors, how good were people at putting away their business biases/agendas?
  • How far they got (hint they got requirements from everyone for the first release).
  • They’ve already gotten their first code contributions.
  • How they plan to build a community: actively looking to hire a community manager.   In the meantime its actively growing and in a week they’ve gone from 10 people in the IRC channel to 150 on Tuesday.

Extra-credit reading:

But wait there’s more…

I got back from OSCON last night with a fist full of videos.  In addition to the above, coming soon to a browser near you are the following interviews:

  • Brett Piatt with more OpenStack goodness
  • J.P. Rangaswami, Chief Scientist at BT — Nature doesn’t require SLAs
  • Simon Phipps about his new company ForgeRock
  • Neil Levine, VP at Canonical about what’s in store for Ubuntu.

Pau for now…


OpenStack Compute – talking to the chief architect

July 18, 2010

Rick Clark used to be the engineering manager at Canonical for Ubuntu server and security as well as lead on their virtualization for their cloud efforts.  He’s now at Rackspace and is applying much of what he learned while at Canonical to his new gig as project lead and chief architect of the just announced OpenStack Compute.

Rick talked to me about what he brought with him from Canonical as well as the details behind OpenStack Compute.

Some of the topics Rick tackles:

  • What is the OpenStack Compute project (hint its a fully open sourced IaaS project)
  • Leveraging what Rick learned from the Ubuntu community, including a regular six month cadence.
  • Rick’s goals for design summit: develop a roadmap for the first release, spec out the software and spend the last two days prototyping and hacking.
  • Why they went with the Apache 2 license and why not AGPL?
  • The Rackspace API (NASA had already started to switch from the Amazon API before combing
  • The project’s core principles: open, open, open

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


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